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 1030

Area Information Systems

Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Information Systems

Summary

The Area Information Systems is part of the Faculty of Business Administration and consists of the chairs of Professor Armin Heinzl, Professor Christian Becker, Professor Hartmut Hoehle and Junior Professor Julia Kroenung.

Information Systems (IS) support individuals in organizations with information for better or faster decisions. They enable new business processes and business models, altering the competitive arena in which a company is embedded. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are utilized for corporate activities from the perspective of distinct user roles. The nature of the IS discipline is both, theoretical and technological. While theoretic-empirical contributions focus on the management and use of Information Systems and Information Infrastructures in organizations, technological-constructivist contributions aim at the design of IS for facilitating new business processes and models.

Bachelor Programs

Our internationally oriented Bachelor in Business Administration provides you with theoretical knowledge in subjects like Marketing, Finance and Business Informatics, and you will spend a semester abroad at one of over 200 partner universities worldwide. Workshops and guest lectures of our corporate partners that regularly visit us on campus to get in touch with you, provide you with connections to the business world and ideally prepare you for your career.

The bachelor’s program “Business Administration” offers a comprehensive economic and business education. With its integrated semester abroad at a foreign partner university, the academic interconnection with neighboring disciplines and two elective courses the program has a unique profile. As an elective, students can choose among numerous courses in the fields of business administration, business law and economics. 

The bachelor’s program in Business Informatics teaches students the basic principles of Business Informatics, Business Administration, Computer Science, and Mathematics. Students then choose to specialize in one of these disciplines in the fifth and sixth semesters. The interdisciplinary structure of the B.Sc. in Business Informatics, its practical orientation, and the inclusion of soft skills seminars mean that graduates of the program are sought after on the national and international labor markets.

Master Programs

The Mannheim Master in Management (MMM) is a consecutive Master’s program, culminating in the academic degree Master of Science (M.Sc.). The MMM differs from other Master’s programs since it allows students to structure the course according to their interests. With various specializations and the opportunity to study a diverse set of subjects, the MMM offers flexibility with academic rigor.

The chairs of the Business School of the University of Mannheim cover a broad spectrum of managerial subjects. Students are able to shape their curriculum and schedule according to their preference and academic interests. Broadly, the specializations on offer at the University are in the areas of:

  • Accounting and Taxation
  • Banking, Finance and Insurance
  • Information Systems
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Operations Management

The master’s program in Business Informatics, which is taught in English, is interdisciplinary in nature. It combines aspects of Informatics with aspects of Business Administration, and provides you with the opportunity to explore the two areas further. The decision which area you would like to focus on more strongly is totally up to you.

The master’s program places great emphasis on putting theoretical knowledge into practice, and we cooperate with renowned partners from the corporate world. An integral part of the program is the team project. Students work on it for one or two semesters, thereby acquiring expert knowledge in their field and developing social skills, such as project management and team work abilities.

The program is concluded with a master’s thesis, which can be written in cooperation with a company.

PhD Programs

The Center for Doctoral Studies in Business offers seven fields of specialization: Accounting, Finance, Information Systems, Management, Marketing, Operations Managment, and Taxation.

Courses

Bachelor in Business Administration

Course
  • Introduction and basic definitions in the field of information systems as well as design and structure of information systems
  • Technological Foundations: hardware and software components, basic functionalities of computer systems and networks, basics of database systems
  • Development of information systems: project management and development processes, selected methods for analysis and design
  • Management of information systems: IT Management Framework, Business/IT Align- ment, IT Organization, IS Investment, IS Adoption
 43
Course

In the last years, the internet has rapidly become an important and fast growing aspect of business life. It is a channel to the customer, a medium to link up with the suppliers, a mar-keting tool and an interactive medium for communication. Consequently, today’s manager needs a profound knowledge of the strategic implications of using the internet for the goals of the firm. Based on the content of the introductory courses on information systems and marketing it is the aim of this elective module to equip the participants with strategic insights into the following aspects of e-business impact:

Fundamental terms and issues of e-business, technological and process-oriented view on e- business, social and behavioral issues of e-business, ethical and regulatory aspects, strategies to employ the digital channel, digital marketing, product and service innovation, reshaping business processes through e-business.

 31
Course

This course first outlines the basics of data and business process modelling based on wide- spread approaches such as entity relationship diagrams, event-driven process chains (EPC), and business process model and notation (BPMN). The remainder of the course then focuses on the use and purpose of integrated information systems across different functional areas in industrial companies. Finally, basics of management support systems such as business intel- ligence systems are addressed.

Outline:

- Business Process Modelling

- Application Systems in:

  • Research and Development
  • Marketing and Sales
  • Procurement and Warehousingo Production
  • Shipping and Customer Serviceo Finance, Accounting, HR

- Planning and Control Systems

 36
Course

This lecture teaches technical basics of information systems and addresses students that want to gain technical knowledge of information systems for IT-related jobs or Master studies.The lecture covers basic principles of a computer’s operations and programming, and givesan introduction to standard algorithms, data structures, and networking. Based on IS 301, the lecture further introduces into software engineering. Topics of the lecture are:

Basics of digital computers

  • Binary system, data representation
  • Information processing, programming

Basics of algorithms


Typical problems of information processing

  • Algorithms for searching and sorting of information
  • Data structures, e.g., arrays, trees, lists, hashing, graphs
  • Complexity estimation

Distributed systems and computer networks


Software engineering: basics and interfaces to the departments

  • Development processes
  • Requirements analysis
 40

Bachelor in Business Informatics

Course

Die Vorlesung Wirtschaftsinformatik I vermittelt die Fundamente der Wirtschaftsinformatik als wissenschaftliche Disziplin. ImRahmen einer Einführung werden unter anderem der Gegenstand, der Wissenschaftscharakter, die Forschungsziele, -theorien, und -methoden sowie Nachbardisziplinen und ein Ländervergleichbehandelt. Im Rahmen der Grundlegung werden zentrale Inhalte wie Informationsbedarf, Informationsverhalten, Informationssystem, Informationsinfrastruktur,Benutzerverhalten, Aspekte einer Entwurfslehre und Inhalte der Evaluationsforschung vermittelt.

 230
Course

During the last decades we witnessed a growing importance of Information Systems (IS) in the business world along with faster and faster innovation cycles. A case in point is the growing IS- related expenditure of corporations, forecasted to total EUR 2.63 trillion in 2012 – a 4.7% growth over 2011 (Gartner 2013). Ranging from the enrichment of routine working tasks (i.e., employee portals to integrate disparate applications, data, and processes (Daniel and White 2005)) to the e-enabled integration of entire business eco-systems (e.g., platform-based integration of supply chains (e.g., Kroenke 2010)), IS have become a vital backbone of businesses.

Consequently, the ability to use IS in a way supporting the overall value proposition of a corporation has become a central success determinant for many firms. Accordingly, the “Development and Management of Information Systems” course is designed to introduce students to the nature, role, and potentials of IS in corporations and enable them to serve as a meaningful interface between technology and business.

Once filling this role in a business context, the future IS professionals are likely to be facing two major trends: the increasing industrialization of IS (Brenner et al. 2007; Daberkow and Radtke 2008; Walter et al. 2007) and a shift towards service-orientation in IT organizations and processes (Hochstein et al. 2005; Roe- wekamp 2007). This brings about challenges such as, among others, managing the trade-off between efficient execution and effective offering or recognizing and mitigating conflicting expectations and goals among the many entities (i.e., software producers, consultants, corporate users, customers) and roles (i.e., business professionals, technical staff, corporate management) involved in an IS.

 208
Course

This lecture covers basic principles of modern information systems. Such systems are characterized by their distributed nature. Thus we will discuss architectures of information systems as well as underlying concepts of computer communication and distributed systems.

The following topics will be covered in the lecture:

  • Introduction to Distributed Systems, and Computer Networks
  • Middleware
  • Application Protocols
  • Presentation Layer
  • Synchronization
  • Time and Global States
  • Replication
  • Peer to Peer Architectures
  • Network Security Basics
 312
Course

This course first outlines the basics of data and business process modelling based on wide-spread approaches such as entityrelationship diagrams, event-driven process chains (EPC), and business process model and notation (BPMN). The remainderof the course then focuses on the use and purpose of integrated information systems across different functional areas inindustrial companies. Finally, basics of management support systems such as business intelligence
systems are addressed.


  • Business Process Modelling
  • Application Systems in
    • Research and Development
    • Marketing and Sales
    • Procurement and Warehousing
    • Production
    • Shipping and Customer Service
    • Finance, Accounting, HR
  • Planning and Control Systems
 233

Doctoral Studies in Business

Course

This course provides an overview of qualitative research methods and their application in the field of Information Systems (IS). The course begins with an introduction to the basic principles, epistemological classification and alternatives of conducting qualitative research. It then provides deeper insights into three types of qualitative research, i.e. positivist variance-theoretic, interpretive, and process theoretic. For the interpretive approach, the students are required to summarize and discuss particular research papers and to reflect on how the principles of conducting interpretive research were applied in the respective papers. For this purpose the students are grouped into teams. Overall, the course is designed to be interactive.

 237
Course

This course is designed for doctoral students in information systems and operations/logistics. It provides a basic understanding of philosophy of science and its epistemological foundations. On the one hand, the course will focus on those concepts which derive knowledge from observation, induction, and refutation of facts. Furthermore, it also takes experiments as well as the new experimentalism into account in order to refer to those disciplines that focus on the evaluation of artifacts like prototypes and algorithms for example. Thus, the underlying epistemological foundations are of central interest to every doctoral students who studies the structure and behavior of information systems and operations/logistics phenomena. The course will be offered in an interactive style. All doctoral students have to offer at least one presentation and a documentation regarding a specific epistemological stance. Furthermore, participants have to discuss an article from literature in order to apply and reinforce the epistemological stance presented. Assignment of topics will be conducted by the lecturer.

 201
Course

Since the 90's information and communication technology (ICT) has fundamentally changed the way organizations are conducting business. Organizations and the entire society are challenged with the effective design, delivery, use, and impact of ICT. The IS discipline addresses this challenge and investigates the phenomena that emerge when the technological and the social system interact (Lee, 2001). A decade ago an intensive discussion on the relevancy and impact of IS research has started (Benbasat and Zmud, 1999; Davenport and Markus 1999; Applegate and King, 1999; Gill and Bhattacherjee, 2009). In this context, several scholars (e.g., Orlikowski and Iacono, 2001) have suggested that the IS community returns to an exploration of the "IT" that underlies the discipline. Design research has potentials to address the above mentioned challenge (Gregor, 2009, Purao et al., 2008). Design research as such is nothing new; it can be found in many disciplines and fields, notably Engineering and Computer Science, using a variety of approaches, methods, and techniques.

This course intends to provide a comprehensive overview on design science in IS research from different perspectives: basic definitions, principles and theoretical foundations, frameworks and methodologies, theory building, as well as design science research examples. PhD students are introduced to the exciting field of design science research and learn basics guidelines to carry out design-oriented research projects. 

 279
Course

This course is designed to provide doctoral students an understanding of the foundation of theory development and contribution. Much of the research in IS draws upon theories from other disciplines, including industrial psychology, sociology, management, and marketing, in developing models to apply to an IS research problem.

However, there is a small body of IS-specific theories which are relevant not only to IS research but to research in other disciplines. The course will include readings from outside the IS discipline as well as within it. The course is designed for both information systems (IS) and non-IS Ph.D. students.

The readings in the course will deepen the students’ understanding of the role of theory in understanding IT related organizational phenomenon and enhance their ability to theorize about IT related to their own various research themes. The objective is to provide students with exposure to theories, the use of theories in research, and the development of new theories to help them better create new or apply existing theories to their own research. The first few sessions of the course will emphasize the nature of theory, theory contribution, and theory development whereas the remaining sessions will examine particular theories related to IT and organizational phenomenon. These latter theories. 

 254

Mannheim Master in Management

Course

IT management today is challenged by fast technological change, new digital opportunities, growing cost pressure, and increasing business and regulatory requirements. IT management needs to ensure that IT functions become much more agile, flexible and efficient than ever before. For a state of the art IT management, a solid knowhow with regard to

  • Intelligent demand management
  • Application and data architecture
  • IT infrastructure
  • Organization and workforce management
  • Business/IT governance and lean IT processes
  • Sourcing and location setup incl. vendor and partner management

is crucial.

In addition, it is expected that IT managers have a good understanding of the core business of their company (business/IT alignment) and sound IT cost management capabilities. Furthermore, IT managers need to be able to understand opportunities of digitization, evaluate the value of new technologies and drive digital transformation jointly with the business.

 39
Course

The goal of this term project is to develop a business model and to implement a software application to solve a real world problem of an industry partner in a student development team environment. We offer a project-based class with hands-on experience on applying Scrum, agile software engineering practices as well as design thinking. Students will learn innovative software product design and development that can be directly applied in a term project.

The technology applied may be SAP HANA Cloud Platform (HCP). The latest openSAP courses give a profound introduction and advanced development practice on HCP. Moreover, state-of-the-art agile software engineering practices will be introduced in parallel as part of the IS 615 lecture. Subsequently, students will develop a real case software application in teams over several development sprints.

Agile software development and design thinking are based on iterative and close customer collaboration. Therefore we provide real 'customers' with whom the students run a design thinking workshop and iteratively develop applications about a topic e.g. Effort Management, Social Media Analytics, Rule-based Intelligent Automation, VIP Visitor Experience,  SAP HANA Express for Non-Profit Organizations and Orderpoint Management.

 238
Course

E-Commerce, Social Media, M-Commerce – Business models that are carried out via electronic and mobile channels all have one in common: They need to be used. If they are not used, they disappear into nirvana and all the investments with them. Thus, usage is a necessary precondition for all e-Business activities. Under consideration of IT adoption theories, social psychological basements and statistical methods that are commonly applied within this context, it is elaborated which factors explicitly enable usage and which inhibit it. Basing on this methodological and theoretical basement behavioral phenomena such as technostress, Social Media addiction, social inclusion though information and communication technologies (ICT), or reactions on privacy threats are discussed, analyzed and evaluated.

 311
Course

Business agility is one of the key determinants of business success. It describes the ability of an organization’s executives to make successful business decisions in a both effective and efficient manner. In most modern enterprises, Business Intelligence and Management Support Systems represent a core enabler of managerial decision making in that they are supplying up-to-date and accurate information about all relevant aspects of a company’s planning and operations: from stock levels to sales volumes, from process cycle times to key indicators of corporate performance. 

As an important category of Enterprise Systems, these applications target improving business decision making and enhancing enterprise-wide transparency. The aim of this module is to introduce theoretical foundations, concepts, tools, and current practice of Business Intelligence and Management Support Systems. Moreover, students are being introduced to decision making at various levels and how various forms of Business Intelligence and Management Support Systems can support them in their work. The module is complemented with a case study. It challenges the students to analyze and propose solutions for a specific enterprise challenge with regards to system-based decision making and enterprise-wide transparency. Several practical exercise sessions are offered during this course. The exercises aim to illustrate students how real-world analytical problems can be solved.

 301
Course

Enterprise software development revolves around complex and interdependent software products for different companies, lines of business and industries. For enterprise software companies there is an inherent trade-off between standard software and domain-specific software solutions when it comes to scaling. Software companies thus have to keep track of various heterogeneous and possibly conflicting market requirements that are subject to changes and updates in ever shorter release cycles. This trade-off becomes even more relevant in the context of the current mega trend towards cloud-based delivery of enterprise software. However, it is essential for every enterprise software company to be able to build meaningful solutions efficiently, i.e. building right things right.

To be able to do so in the long run, software companies have been elaborating good practices to ensure both innovative product ideas and efficient development processes. However, the larger the software companies the more elaborate corporate standards and processes have been established – often hindering innovation. In order to address the innovators’ dilemma, Business Model Innovation, Design Thinking, Lean Management and Agile Software Engineering practices are adopted and intertwined in large-scale software development organizations.

 39
Course

Information technology (IT) is changing our society and the world of business. It is difficult to think of any business process or functional area that is unaffected by IT in contemporary firms. All conscientious managers, particularly those who are or aspire to be leaders, have a duty to manage all resources including IT resources which are becoming increasingly critical for success in a responsible and thoughtful manner. Regardless of their current functional affiliation or career goals, managers’ future success will critically depend on how they lead and direct IT-enabled strategic changes.

This course introduces some of the key issues in managing IT. It provides an overview of IT systems in contemporary firms and how they enable and support a firm’s strategic and operational goals. By understanding how to engage in IT-related decision making and governance, managers can craft superior strategies and use IT as a lever to innovate and transform for competitive success. We will deal with decisions regarding the alignment of IT and business, the governance of IT within the firm, the outsourcing and offshoring of IT, and the controlling of IT initiatives. All of these issues will be dealt with from a strategic management perspective.

 40
Course

Enterprise Systems (ES) represent a specific category of information systems. They build on pre-packaged industry best practices embedded in standardized product software and target large‐scale integration of data and business processes across all company's functional areas and beyond company borderlines. Enterprise Systems strongly interplay with work practices of individual employees as well as organizational structures shaping and being shaped by individuals' behavior. The ES lifecycle involves various entities both external and internal to the company. As such, they impact multiple levels of a company, ranging from the individual employee to groups to the entire organization and even its associated network.
As critical as the ability to manage these ES is to most businesses, as challenging it is as well. This module is designed to provide a comprehensive insight into theoretical foundations, concepts, tools, and current practice of ES. The lecture is complemented with exercises and a case study. Students get the opportunity to collect hands-on experiences with
commercial software products and analyze and propose solutions for a specific ES challenge. Thus, allowing them to build up first-hand experience with this important aspect for managing businesses successfully.

 254
Course

This module gives an overview on Pervasive Computing systems. These systems consist of dynamic collections of (possibly mobile and/or embedded) devices that collaborate with each other depending on the state of their current physical environment or context. The module introduces systems, concepts and algorithms for Pervasive Computing, e.g. adaptation frameworks, context management, sensors and actuator networks.

 251
Course

This lecture offers theoretical and practical concepts for modeling, analyzing, and implementing business processes with information and communication technology. Participants will be offered related business knowledge as well as the required methodological foundations from an information systems perspective in order to apply contemporary business process modeling and analysis tools.

 242
Course

More and more products, from consumer to business markets, show an ever increasing amount of software at their very heart. The ability to understand, design, and manage software-intense products has become of great importance to ensure sustainable success across all industries.
This module introduces key aspects of the entire software product lifecycle, ranging from product strategy and planning, to the actual product development and finally the postdevelopment phase covering aspects such das the product launch and product support. Furthermore, the interplay between processes, people, and practices will be discussed and contemporary software development paradigms will be framed into this interplay. This course puts specific emphasize on the two roles of the product manager and the product designer (also: Usability / User Experience Professional) within software development.
Following an interdisciplinary perspective, this course will introduce key concepts from the field of management, marketing and human computer interaction. The course contents will be put into a practical perspective by selected industry talks. Furthermore, as part of a case study, the students will be asked to analyze and propose solutions for a given software
product development challenge leveraging the knowledge acquired within the lecture and industry talks.

 290
Course

This course provides students with an introduction to scientific research methods and theories in the field of information systems. Master students gain a broad overview of the strengths and weaknesses of different methods and theoretical perspectives. This overview prepares them for conducting own, bounded research projects (e.g., master theses) as a first step towards a scientific career. This course primarily targets students of the MMBR but is also open to students of the MMM and the Master in Business Informatics. 

In this course, students come to understand the importance of theory for organizing and cumulating knowledge as well as the importance of rigorous empirical methods to establish the validity of findings. The course covers publications in premier IS journals to exemplify and discuss procedures of qualitative, quantitative, and design-oriented research.  

 372

Master in Business Informatics

Course

IT management today is challenged by fast technological change, new digital opportunities, growing cost pressure, and increasing business and regulatory requirements. IT management needs to ensure that IT functions become much more agile, flexible and efficient than ever before. For a state of the art IT management, a solid knowhow with regard to

  • Intelligent demand management
  • Application and data architecture
  • IT infrastructure
  • Organization and workforce management
  • Business/IT governance and lean IT processes
  • Sourcing and location setup incl. vendor and partner management

is crucial.

In addition, it is expected that IT managers have a good understanding of the core business of their company (business/IT alignment) and sound IT cost management capabilities. Furthermore, IT managers need to be able to understand opportunities of digitization, evaluate the value of new technologies and drive digital transformation jointly with the business.

 39
Course

The goal of this term project is to develop a business model and to implement a software application to solve a real world problem of an industry partner in a student development team environment. We offer a project-based class with hands-on experience on applying Scrum, agile software engineering practices as well as design thinking. Students will learn innovative software product design and development that can be directly applied in a term project.

The technology applied may be SAP HANA Cloud Platform (HCP). The latest openSAP courses give a profound introduction and advanced development practice on HCP. Moreover, state-of-the-art agile software engineering practices will be introduced in parallel as part of the IS 615 lecture. Subsequently, students will develop a real case software application in teams over several development sprints.

Agile software development and design thinking are based on iterative and close customer collaboration. Therefore we provide real 'customers' with whom the students run a design thinking workshop and iteratively develop applications about a topic e.g. Effort Management, Social Media Analytics, Rule-based Intelligent Automation, VIP Visitor Experience,  SAP HANA Express for Non-Profit Organizations and Orderpoint Management.

 238
Course

E-Commerce, Social Media, M-Commerce – Business models that are carried out via electronic and mobile channels all have one in common: They need to be used. If they are not used, they disappear into nirvana and all the investments with them. Thus, usage is a necessary precondition for all e-Business activities. Under consideration of IT adoption theories, social psychological basements and statistical methods that are commonly applied within this context, it is elaborated which factors explicitly enable usage and which inhibit it. Basing on this methodological and theoretical basement behavioral phenomena such as technostress, Social Media addiction, social inclusion though information and communication technologies (ICT), or reactions on privacy threats are discussed, analyzed and evaluated.

 311
Course

Business agility is one of the key determinants of business success. It describes the ability of an organization’s executives to make successful business decisions in a both effective and efficient manner. In most modern enterprises, Business Intelligence and Management Support Systems represent a core enabler of managerial decision making in that they are supplying up-to-date and accurate information about all relevant aspects of a company’s planning and operations: from stock levels to sales volumes, from process cycle times to key indicators of corporate performance. 

As an important category of Enterprise Systems, these applications target improving business decision making and enhancing enterprise-wide transparency. The aim of this module is to introduce theoretical foundations, concepts, tools, and current practice of Business Intelligence and Management Support Systems. Moreover, students are being introduced to decision making at various levels and how various forms of Business Intelligence and Management Support Systems can support them in their work. The module is complemented with a case study. It challenges the students to analyze and propose solutions for a specific enterprise challenge with regards to system-based decision making and enterprise-wide transparency. Several practical exercise sessions are offered during this course. The exercises aim to illustrate students how real-world analytical problems can be solved.

 301
Course

Enterprise software development revolves around complex and interdependent software products for different companies, lines of business and industries. For enterprise software companies there is an inherent trade-off between standard software and domain-specific software solutions when it comes to scaling. Software companies thus have to keep track of various heterogeneous and possibly conflicting market requirements that are subject to changes and updates in ever shorter release cycles. This trade-off becomes even more relevant in the context of the current mega trend towards cloud-based delivery of enterprise software. However, it is essential for every enterprise software company to be able to build meaningful solutions efficiently, i.e. building right things right.

To be able to do so in the long run, software companies have been elaborating good practices to ensure both innovative product ideas and efficient development processes. However, the larger the software companies the more elaborate corporate standards and processes have been established – often hindering innovation. In order to address the innovators’ dilemma, Business Model Innovation, Design Thinking, Lean Management and Agile Software Engineering practices are adopted and intertwined in large-scale software development organizations.

 39
Course

Information technology (IT) is changing our society and the world of business. It is difficult to think of any business process or functional area that is unaffected by IT in contemporary firms. All conscientious managers, particularly those who are or aspire to be leaders, have a duty to manage all resources including IT resources which are becoming increasingly critical for success in a responsible and thoughtful manner. Regardless of their current functional affiliation or career goals, managers’ future success will critically depend on how they lead and direct IT-enabled strategic changes.

This course introduces some of the key issues in managing IT. It provides an overview of IT systems in contemporary firms and how they enable and support a firm’s strategic and operational goals. By understanding how to engage in IT-related decision making and governance, managers can craft superior strategies and use IT as a lever to innovate and transform for competitive success. We will deal with decisions regarding the alignment of IT and business, the governance of IT within the firm, the outsourcing and offshoring of IT, and the controlling of IT initiatives. All of these issues will be dealt with from a strategic management perspective.

 40
Course

Enterprise Systems (ES) represent a specific category of information systems. They build on pre-packaged industry best practices embedded in standardized product software and target large‐scale integration of data and business processes across all company's functional areas and beyond company borderlines. Enterprise Systems strongly interplay with work practices of individual employees as well as organizational structures shaping and being shaped by individuals' behavior. The ES lifecycle involves various entities both external and internal to the company. As such, they impact multiple levels of a company, ranging from the individual employee to groups to the entire organization and even its associated network.
As critical as the ability to manage these ES is to most businesses, as challenging it is as well. This module is designed to provide a comprehensive insight into theoretical foundations, concepts, tools, and current practice of ES. The lecture is complemented with exercises and a case study. Students get the opportunity to collect hands-on experiences with
commercial software products and analyze and propose solutions for a specific ES challenge. Thus, allowing them to build up first-hand experience with this important aspect for managing businesses successfully.

 254
Course

This module gives an overview on Pervasive Computing systems. These systems consist of dynamic collections of (possibly mobile and/or embedded) devices that collaborate with each other depending on the state of their current physical environment or context. The module introduces systems, concepts and algorithms for Pervasive Computing, e.g. adaptation frameworks, context management, sensors and actuator networks.

 251
Course

This lecture offers theoretical and practical concepts for modeling, analyzing, and implementing business processes with information and communication technology. Participants will be offered related business knowledge as well as the required methodological foundations from an information systems perspective in order to apply contemporary business process modeling and analysis tools.

 242
Course

More and more products, from consumer to business markets, show an ever increasing amount of software at their very heart. The ability to understand, design, and manage software-intense products has become of great importance to ensure sustainable success across all industries.
This module introduces key aspects of the entire software product lifecycle, ranging from product strategy and planning, to the actual product development and finally the postdevelopment phase covering aspects such das the product launch and product support. Furthermore, the interplay between processes, people, and practices will be discussed and contemporary software development paradigms will be framed into this interplay. This course puts specific emphasize on the two roles of the product manager and the product designer (also: Usability / User Experience Professional) within software development.
Following an interdisciplinary perspective, this course will introduce key concepts from the field of management, marketing and human computer interaction. The course contents will be put into a practical perspective by selected industry talks. Furthermore, as part of a case study, the students will be asked to analyze and propose solutions for a given software
product development challenge leveraging the knowledge acquired within the lecture and industry talks.

 290
Course

This course provides students with an introduction to scientific research methods and theories in the field of information systems. Master students gain a broad overview of the strengths and weaknesses of different methods and theoretical perspectives. This overview prepares them for conducting own, bounded research projects (e.g., master theses) as a first step towards a scientific career. This course primarily targets students of the MMBR but is also open to students of the MMM and the Master in Business Informatics. 

In this course, students come to understand the importance of theory for organizing and cumulating knowledge as well as the importance of rigorous empirical methods to establish the validity of findings. The course covers publications in premier IS journals to exemplify and discuss procedures of qualitative, quantitative, and design-oriented research.  

 372

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