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Association for Information Systems

Information Systems

Summary

The Association for Information Systems (AIS) serves society through the advancement of knowledge and the promotion of excellence in the practice and study of information systems. AIS is the premier professional association for individuals and organizations who lead the research, teaching, practice, and study of information systems worldwide. (Revised 12/2010)

Other Programs

AIS offers a series of one-hour webinars that encourage thoughtful discourse on a variety of different subjects related to information systems.  We allow our members to help choose the subject of each webinar, and we in turn select experts on the chosen topic to provide our members with tricks of the trade.

The best part?  Both the live webinars and recorded sessions are 100% free to our members, who can participate  in these webinars live or access the slides and recordings easily online. 

Syllabi

Business Process Management

Jan vom Brocke, Michael Rosemann

Business Process Management (BPM) has become one of the most important competences for information professionals. The potential of BPM lies particularly in the integration of advanced information technology and organizational and managerial methods in order to foster and leverage business innovation, operational excellence and intra- and inter-organizational collaboration.  

BPM comprises activities such as the identification, definition and modeling of business processes, their implementation and execution, monitoring, mining and controlling as well as continuous and disruptive process improvements. Enterprise-wide, it requires corporate capabilities such as governance, methods, information technology, culture, people, and strategic alignment. As such, BPM is considered an integrated management approach, which is characterized by a process-focused view of the organization, mainly focusing on the dynamics of value creation by people using technology in business tasks.

While the origins of BPM go back to application areas such as production and logistics, where processes are comparably well structured, BPM today is increasingly applied in all sorts of business areas including less well-structured areas - such as knowledge-intensive and collaborative ones. Early contributions of BPM were oriented towards efficiency gains through concepts such as automation and standardization. Disciplines such as workflow management, quality management and operations management contributed to BPM. Today, BPM has also shown its potential to innovate processes as well as services and entire business models, drawing from and contributing strongly to innovation management.

Collaboration Engineering

Robert O. Briggs, Jan Marco Leimeister, Matthias Soellner

In the digital age, characterized by increasingly distributed and interactive creation of value, effective collaboration is a key factor for being successful on the market. Collaboration Engineering is a systemic approach for designing collaboration processes that can be applied by practitioners to complete recurring and important tasks at a high level of quality. The core aim of Collaboration Engineering is to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of collaboration by maximizing the joint effort of all participants towards accomplishing a joint goal. Thus, Collaboration Engineering increases the quality of the generated results as well as the satisfaction among the involved participants. In Collaboration Engineering the use of IT has shown to offer new tools for structuring collaboration activities. The use of such tools has already led to important changes in human collaboration in private and work settings, and is supposed to led to further changes in the future.

Design Science Research in Information Systems

Alan Hevner, Samir Chatterjee

The Design Science Research (DSR) paradigm has its roots in the sciences and engineering of the artificial. It is fundamentally a problem-solving paradigm. DSR seeks to enhance human knowledge with the creation of innovative artifacts. These artifacts embody the ideas, practices, technical capabilities, and products through which information and computing technology and systems (abbreviated here as the field of Information Systems (IS)) can be efficiently developed and effectively used. Artifacts are not exempt from natural laws or behavioral theories. To the contrary, their creation relies on existing laws and theories that are applied, tested, modified, and extended through the experience, creativity, intuition, and problem solving capabilities of the researcher. Thus, the results of DSR include both the newly designed artifact and a fuller understanding of the theories of why the artifact is an improvement to the relevant application context. Design activities are central to most applied disciplines. Research in design has a long history in many fields including architecture, engineering, education, psychology, anthropology, and the fine arts. The IS field since its advent in the late 1940’s has appropriated many of the ideas, concepts, and methods of DSR that have originated in these other disciplines. However, IS as composed of inherently mutable and adaptable hardware, software, and human interfaces provide many unique and challenging design problems that call for new and creative research methods. The community of DSR scholars in the IS field has grown significantly over the past 30 years. Publication opportunities have expanded in the top IS journals and the top IS conferences feature tracks devoted to DSR scholarship. In particular, the annual Design Science Research in Information Systems and Technology (DESRIST) conference is devoted to presentation of the best DSR papers from the international IS community.

Energy Informatics

Marie-Claude Boudreau, Richard T. Watson

Energy Informatics <http://people.terry.uga.edu/rwatson/mist4550&6550/> involves analyzing, designing, and implementing systems to increase the efficiency of energy demand and supply systems. This requires the collection and analysis of data used to optimize energy distribution and consumption networks. Students will leverage the necessary information systems competencies and multi-disciplinary knowledge to increase societal energy efficiency. Sustainability is usually defined as “meeting the needs of the current generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” Sustainability is currently one of the most important issues facing our world, and will continue to be so for decades as it will take a long-term to reverse some adverse environmental changes. Information System (IS) and Information Technology (IT) play a critical role in sustainable development, and Energy Informatics is an approach to addressing sustainability issues and reducing energy consumption. By learning about Energy Informatics, students can leverage the necessary computing competencies and multi-disciplinary knowledge to contribution to creating a sustainable future.

Gender and the Global Information Technology Sector

Eileen Trauth

The growing trend toward outsourcing, off shoring, and dispersion of work across national boundaries means that students entering the workforce in the twenty-first century must be prepared to deal with a global client base and global colleagues. Part of this preparation includes understanding the gender diversity of colleagues, clients and users with whom people will be working -- both virtually and face-to-face -- to develop, deploy and use information technology solutions. As such, part of one’s preparation for a career as an information technology (IT) professional needs to include an understanding of gender as it relates to the information technology field.

Understanding the gender and cultural diversity of both colleagues and users has ramifications for the way in which work is accomplished, user requirements for technology are understood, and interaction with computer-based tools is accomplished. However, to varying degrees around the world, women and gender minorities are underrepresented in the information technology field. They are under represented both in the information technology workforce and in the conceptualization of the IT user. Similarly, a dominant model of masculinity is associated with technology development, deployment and use. For these reasons, it is necessary for those working in the IT field to have an understanding of gender issues in order to have a complete understanding of users, and to work productively with colleagues.

Introduction to IS Research as a Science

Jan Recker

The Information Systems discipline lies at the intersection of two of the most exciting and dynamic fields today: Business and Information Technology. The aim of the discipline is to understand, predict, and support the effective design, use, and management of information technology in organizations and markets and to develop knowledge about phenomena relating to information technology-in-use. This involves breaking new ground in emerging topics (the latest technologies) and enduring topics (how best to design, implement, and use information technology). As a research student in information systems, you are expected to contribute to the body of knowledge in this field by designing and conducting original studies and to publish your findings. This course is designed to introduce doctoral and other higher-degree research students to the process of scientific research in the fields of Information Systems. The course develops both broad and detailed understanding of different strands of information systems research, relevant research methods and theories associated with the strands of research, and the craft and processes of writing and publishing information systems research articles.

Neuro-Information-Systems (NeuroIS)

René Riedl, Pierre-Majorique Léger

NeuroIS is a field in Information Systems (IS) that makes use of neurophysiological knowledge and tools to better understand the development, adoption, and impact of information and communication technologies (ICT). The idea of applying cognitive neuroscience approaches in IS research appeared at the 2007 International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS) and at two pre-ICIS meetings (Sixth Annual Workshop on Human-Computer Interaction Research in Management Information Systems and OASIS Workshop 2007); a very limited number of publications on ICT and brain research were published in IS outlets before 2007. 

NeuroIS examines topics lying at the intersection of IS research and neurophysiology. Specifically, NeuroIS research comprises conceptual and empirical works, as well as theoretical and design science research. It includes research based on all types of neurophysiological tools, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), electroencephalograhy (EEG), fNIRS (functional near-infrared spectroscopy), electromyography (EMG), hormone assessments, or skin conductance and heart rate measurement. Moreover, it is foreseeable that quantitative and molecular genetics could play a significant role in future NeuroIS research.

Analysis of the extant NeuroIS literature shows that papers address the following topics, among others: employment of neurophysiological knowledge and tools to examine trust, technostress, website design, technology adoption, human-computer interaction, emotions in e-commerce, information behavior, IS design science, mental workload, social networks, usability, software development, and business process modeling and enterprise systems. Also, software prototypes of NeuroIS applications, which use bio-signals (e.g., EEG, skin conductance, pupil dilation) as system input, are an essential topic in the field; such systems are referred to as neuro-adaptive information systems. Methodological and ethical discussions are also critical.

Against the background of the fact that NeuroIS has been established as a research field in the IS discipline in the past decade, it is useful to have a syllabus in which the major concepts of the NeuroIS field are documented. More and more universities want to offer a NeuroIS introductory course, often at the graduate level. Based on such a course, students should be able to get an overview of the field in order to make an informed decision about whether, and if so how, they would like to get engaged in NeuroIS research (e.g., PhD thesis).

Importantly, because NeuroIS is a relatively young field, we observe an ongoing development of concepts, and hence this syllabus documents the current state of the field (as it is perceived by the authors of this document). It follows that it is possible that concepts which are considered important today will become less relevant in the future. Likewise, new topics which have not yet received attention in the NeuroIS literature will become important in the future. Thus, as a consequence of the moderate maturity level of the NeuroIS field, it is important that this syllabus is updated on a regular basis, at least up until a point of consolidation of the concepts in the NeuroIS field is reached.    

Retail Information Systems

Jörg Becker

Retail is one of the most important sectors in today’s economy. Since the year 2000, the global trade volume has almost tripled from 6.4 trillion Euro to 18.4 trillion Euro in 2012.[1] Of course, this enormous amount does not arise out of nowhere but involves thousands of companies with millions of employees.[2] Based on this, complex structures arise due to various links between and within companies. Therefore, it is necessary to have a look at the whole supply chain as well as the value chain within companies. Whereas the supply chain allows several types of retail which can differ in terms of, for instance, invoicing or the goods delivery between companies, the value chain of a company focuses on internal company processes.

 

Although the application of the processes differs from company to company, their underlying structure is similar. Retail companies comprise departments for their supplier and customer relationship management, their order management and selling, their logistics and their accounting. The value chain of a retail company is a large cross-functional process from purchasing through selling products instead of a simple series of functional executions. The departments fulfill subprocesses of the overall process. The integration of the processes and the data often depicts one of the most difficult barriers to overcome. At this point, retail information systems can provide a remedy as they integrate processes and data from different departments for an efficient process execution. Thus, it is necessary to have an integrated process perspective on the company and to understand how integrated retail information systems can help to efficiently support the company’s business.


[1] http://de.statista.com/statistik/daten/studie/37143/umfrage/weltweites-exportvolumen-im-handel-seit-1950/

[2] https://www.destatis.de/DE/ZahlenFakten/Wirtschaftsbereiche/BinnenhandelGastgewerbeTourismus/BinnenhandelGastgewerbeTourismus.html

Service Engineering and Management

Jan Marco Leimeister, Philipp Menschner

Services dominate western economies, accounting for about 70% of employment and gross value added. Moreover, services are the only part of western economies to have expanded in terms of employment in recent years, as manufacturing, mining and agriculture continue to contract. Most of service innovation today is about the adoption and effective implementation of IT, as IT changes services in three ways: first, the use of IT contributes by enabling faster and more structured development processes; second, new services offerings arise by applying and integrating IT; third, IT leverages industrialization potentials for services such as standardization, automation or new ways of customer integration. Guided by a value proposition, service systems enable value co-creation through configuration of actors (human and non-human) and resources (including technology, information, and physical artifacts), therefore constituting highly complex socio-technical systems. In recent years, service emerged into a key concept in information systems (IS). By emphasizing a systems perspective on services, this allows addressing the connectedness and complementarity of constituting elements in enabling the co-creation of value. Essential to the successful development of services is that they are underlined by a reasonable service process and design. Service Engineering is defined as the systematic design and development of services by deploying engineering methods, practices, and tools.

People

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Luca Cremona is Assistant Professor of Information Systems at the School of Industrial Engineering at LIUC University where he is in charge of research activities, technology transfer projects and teaching on topics of digital innovation within manufacturing and services industries. He managed and coordinated several technology transfer projects on Digital Transformation (within Industry 4.0 vision) both at national and international levels. He built his researching, teaching and consulting skills by working in different countries such as: Denmark, China, Switzerland, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Angola.

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Coordinator for Marketing and Organisation
Institute of Information Systems

Education

2011: Bachelor of Arts in International Business Management at the Hochschule Furtwangen University, HFU Business School, Villingen-Schwenningen, Germany

2009 - 2010: Study exchange at the San Francisco State University, USA

2007 - 2011: Bachelor studies in International Business Management (in English) at the Hochschule Furtwangen University, HFU Business School, Villingen-Schwenningen, Germany

2006 - 2007: Studies of Law and English at the University of Innsbruck, Austria

2006: Stay abroad at the Takapuna Grammar School in Auckland, New Zealand

2006: High School diploma at the B.O.R.G Dornbirn-Schoren, Austria

Career

Since 2016: Coordinator for Marketing and Organisation at the Institute of Information Systems at the University of Liechtenstein in Vaduz, Liechtenstein

2013 - 2016: PR-/Online-Manager at Bachmann electronic GmbH in Feldkirch, Austria

2011 - 2013: Marketing, Communication and Organisation at Cree GmbH in Bregenz/Dornbirn, Austria

2010 - 2011: Internship in Corporate Communications at Zumtobel Group in Dornbirn, Austria

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Jan is the Hilti Endowed Chair of Business Process Management, Director of the Institute of Information Systems, and Vice-President Research and Innovation at the University of Liechtenstein.

His research has appeared amongst others in Management Information Systems Quarterly (MISQ)Journal of Management Information Systems (JMIS), the EuropeanJournal of Information Systems (EJIS), Information Systems Journal (ISJ), and Communications of the ACM (CACM) as well as in practitioners’ outlets such as MIT Sloan Management Review and Management Information Systems Ececutive (MISQe).

Jan has teaching experience from 24 universities in 13 countries, including many of the Financial Times Top 50 Business Schools such as the University of St.Gallenin Switzerland, the Vlerick Business School in Belgium, the University of Warwick in the UK, and the Smurfit School of Business in Ireland. He is also an active supporter of the AAU IS PhD program at the University of Addis Ababa (Ethiopia).He served as AIS Vice President Education 2014-2017 and he has been awarded the AIS Award for Innovation in Teaching 2013 as well as the AIS Technology Challenge Award 2015.   

Jan is an invited speaker, trusted advisor and trainer on IT and Management for many organizations around the world. For more details see http://janvombrocke.com.

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Editors

Have you met...
People

Jan is the Hilti Endowed Chair of Business Process Management, Director of the Institute of Information Systems, and Vice-President Research and Innovation at the University of Liechtenstein.

His research has appeared amongst others in Management Information Systems Quarterly (MISQ)Journal of Management Information Systems (JMIS), the EuropeanJournal of Information Systems (EJIS), Information Systems Journal (ISJ), and Communications of the ACM (CACM) as well as in practitioners’ outlets such as MIT Sloan Management Review and Management Information Systems Ececutive (MISQe).

Jan has teaching experience from 24 universities in 13 countries, including many of the Financial Times Top 50 Business Schools such as the University of St.Gallenin Switzerland, the Vlerick Business School in Belgium, the University of Warwick in the UK, and the Smurfit School of Business in Ireland. He is also an active supporter of the AAU IS PhD program at the University of Addis Ababa (Ethiopia).He served as AIS Vice President Education 2014-2017 and he has been awarded the AIS Award for Innovation in Teaching 2013 as well as the AIS Technology Challenge Award 2015.   

Jan is an invited speaker, trusted advisor and trainer on IT and Management for many organizations around the world. For more details see http://janvombrocke.com.

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