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Department of Information Systems and Operations

Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Information Systems

Summary

The computerisation of everday life, the "Internet of Things" or "Smart Homes" are realisitic visions of the future, which are created by research laboratories of high-tech companies and universities. The economy, in the meanwhile, is working intensively on new concepts for processing, providing and collecting data: cloud computing, virtualisation, Semantic Web, Mobile Computing, Intelligent Sensor Networks, Advanced Analytics or service-oriented architectures are just some of the catchphrases in this context. They promise to revolutionise the business processes of tomorrow. At Vienna University of Economics and Business (WU), the Department of Information Systems and Operations has taken on the task to shape the future by closely cooperating with companies and other research institutions in order to work out how those visions can be realised to ensure that the current challenges of the knowledge society, globalisation and sustainability can be mastered successfully.

The department consists of the following 5 institutes (external links):

  • Information Business (Univ.Prof. Dr. Jan Mendling)
  • Information Management and Control (Univ.Prof. Dr. Edward Bernroider)
  • Information Systems and New Media (Univ.Prof. Dr. Gustaf Neumann)
  • Management Information Systems (Univ.Prof. Dr. Sarah Spiekermann)
  • Production Management (Univ.Prof. Dipl.-Ing. Dr. Werner Jammernegg)

Master Programs

The Master Program provides students with IT knowledge and skills with a particular emphasis on management and research topics. The aim of the program is to combine technical and business topics wherever possible instead of providing separate courses. The program consists of a broad mandatory common body of knowledge that provides a basis of the electives, providing advanced contents in selective topics. The common body of knowledge covers the areas "IS and Organizations", "IS and Management", and "IS and Development". The curriculum of the master program was designed together with a board of leading Austrian stakeholders from industry and government to meet today's challenges and to give a solid basis for tomorrow's demands.

Under the following link an overview of the courses can be found:

https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15w/108001

 

Courses

Information Systems

Lecture

The course aims to show the relationships between the operational processing of information to provide goods and services and the derivation of management information from these operational data. To illustrate these relationships, Peter presents important types of Information Systems from a technical point of view and Manuela presents the adequate management control methods.

Typical functionalities are derived from business processes and their potential implementation in IT systems is shown. Methods to analyse the data generated in these systems are presented as well as their integration in the processes to manage a company.

The importance to establish a close connection between operational processes and the Information Systems to derive information for management decisions is stressed.


The lecture covers the following content:

  • Fundamentals of information and Information Systems
  • The company as a system of various sub-systems
  • Fundamentals of cost accounting
  • Cost classification, typical cost behaviour, methods of cost allocation, relevant costs for decision making
  • Cost-benefit analysis of Information Systems
  • Evaluation models (hedonic wage model, BSC, market response models)
  • Design and typical functionalities of ERP-systems
  • Design and typical functionalities of MIS
  • Investment decisions, considering IT related factors
  • Optimal production program, Break-even analysis
  • Budgeting
  • Design and typical functionalities of Supply Chain Management Systems
  • Make-or-buy, ABC-Analysis, order planning, cash-to-cash cycle
  • Fundamentals of Electronic Markets
  • Potential advantages and possible business models
  • Product Lifecycle Management
  • Activity Based Costing
  • Target Costing
  • Lifecycle Costing/Total Cost of Ownership
 695
Lecture

The course provides an introduction into data mining and decision support and provides an overview of basic concepts and methods in classification, regression, and unsupervised learning. Additionally, students will get some hands-on experience with widely used Python data mining libraries, such as Pandas, Scikit-Learn, and Statmodel.

 

 736
Lecture

In this course we will discuss:

  • the basic characteristics of distributed systems;
  • architectures of distributed systems;
  • problems related to the communication in distributed systems;
  • methods and techniques to address such problems;
  • different types of middleware;
  • software patterns for distributed systems;
  • an introduction to graph theory and graph algorithms.

 

The course focuses on generic concepts, techniques, methods, and open standards for distributed systems.
We do not (explicitly) discuss the implementation of distributed systems via a particular programming language or software platform.

 

 

 

 538
Other course

This is one of the competence areas that can be done in the masters programme. It consist of 3 courses, which are described in the sections below.

A more detailed description for each course can be found here:

ICT Law 1: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15w/1454

ICT Law 2: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/5663

ICT Law 3: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/5533

 613
Lecture

The focus of this course is model-driven (software) development.
We will discuss established concepts, techniques, and methods for:

  • the specification of graphical and textual software languages;
  • the specification of domain-specific (modeling) languages;
  • the mapping between models on different abstraction layers;
  • the verification of software artifacts;
  • the application of software patterns.

In addition, we will give an overview for the process aspects of software development.
Other (equally important) topics, such as project management or configuration management are not part of this course.

 618
Lecture

This course aims to provide studentswith an insight into the factors that drive successful IT innovation. The first half of the course introduces to innovation management in general, corporate entrepreneurship and the new phenomenon of companies’ successful leveraging of open innovation and user innovation. The second half of the course focuses on innovation diffusion. A detailed look is taken at concrete characteristics of successful digital products and services. What’s important when engineering digital products for broader market acceptance? And what does one have to watchout for when judging on the quality of new IT product- and service proposals? How can false trust in hype-cycles be avoided? To answer these questions, human-centred technical design processes as well as economic factors need to beconsidered.

Human-centred and ethical technical design involves not only an understanding of adjusted and more user-centred system development life-cycles, but also insights into the long history of research in technology acceptance models. Here, usability issues are playing a role (i.e.affective, cognitive and physical engineering), but equally important are more general factors of system acceptability such as trust, social compatibility,culture and personality as well as the respect of human values in the design of systems (such as the desire for privacy, control or autonomy). The economic perspective, in contrast, covers a selected number of those market forces which are particularly relevant for IT acceptance and success regardless of product appeal: in particular pricing, standardization and network effects.

 761
Lecture

Driven by technologies like computers, wireless communications and the internet, the so called „information society“ leads to a fast-growing field of law dealing with the legal aspects of these technologies.

This lecture shall provide an overview of and introduction to IT-Law and primarily deals with the following topics:

-    Legal protection of computer software and databases
-    Telecommunication, Privacy and Media Law
-    Distant Selling and Consumer Protection Regulations
-    E-Commerce Law

 501
Other course

This is one of the majors that can be done in the masters programme. It consist of 5 courses, which are described in the sections below.

A more detailed description for each course can be found here:

IS Eng 1: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15w/1265

IS Eng 2: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15w/0124

IS Eng 3: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/5455

IS Eng 4: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/5456

IS Eng 5: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/5457

 620
Other course

This is one of the competence areas that can be done in the masters programme. It consist of 3 courses, which are described in the sections below.

A more detailed description for each course can be found here:

Accountability in the Information Society: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/4249

IS Accountability and Performance Management I: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15w/1548

IS Accountability and Performance Management II https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15w/1606

 555
Other course

This is one of the majors that can be done in the masters programme. It consist of 5 courses, which are described in the sections below.

A more detailed description for each course can be found here:

Business Process Modeling: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15w/1399

Business Process Implementation: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15w/1401

Datawarehouse Management with SAP BW: An Introduction: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/5261

Marketing and Retail: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/5262

Integration of Business Processes in SAP ERP: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/5226

 

 

 840
Other course

This is one of the majors that can be done in the masters programme. It is a combination of the competence areas "IS Management and Accountability" and "Sustainable IS" which can also be found under the courses on this website and consists of 6 courses.

A more detailed description for each course can be found here:

Course 1: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/4249

Course 2: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15w/1548

Course 3: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/4158

Course 4: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/5147

Course 5: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15w/1606

Course 6: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15w/1513

 602
Lecture

The course will cover the following topics:

  • Overview of IT Governance and Controlling
  • IT investment appraisal methods and frameworks
  • Enterprise IT programme management
  • IT Performance measurement and reporting
  • IT project controlling (scope and change management)
  • Project network controls
  • Support tools and frameworks
  • An introduction to CobiT and internal control systems
 598
Other course

This is one of the competence arease that can be done in the masters programme. It consist of 3 courses, which are described in the sections below.

A more detailed description for each course can be found here:

Concepts and Methods for Location-Based Business Analytics: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/5234

Location Analytics Tools and Applications: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/5235

SBI Project: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15w/1390

 

 965
Other course

This is one of the competence areas that can be done in the masters programme. It consist of 3 courses, which are described in the sections below.

A more detailed description for each course can be found here:

Ethical Computing: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/4158

Privacy and Security: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15s/5147

Sustainable IS Seminar: https://learn.wu.ac.at/vvz/15w/1513

 608
Lecture

This course gives a short introduction into fundamental mathematical properties of computer hardware and software. In studying this subject we seek to determine what can be and what cannot be computed, how quickly, with how much memory, and of which type of computational model. Computational problems are strongly related to the recognition of particular languages, that is, sets of strings over same given alphabet. Thus we will study various types of automata and characterize the kind of languages that can be recognized by their spective type of machine.  

  • Deterministic Finite Automata
    have a finite number of states but no memory. They recognize regular languages which can be described by regular expressions.
  • Nondeterministic Finite Automata
    are similar to deterministic automata except that they allow to run all possible branches of an algorithm in parallel. Interestingly, nondeterministic automata often are not more powerful than their deterministic counterpart.
  • PushDown Automata
    are finite automata with a stack added. They recognize languages which are generated by some context free grammar.
  • Turing Machines
    are the most powerful machines. They have a finite number of states with an infinite tape added that can be both read and written at arbitrary positions. By the Church-Turing thesis our intuitive notion of algorithm is equivalent to Turing machine algorithms. An important difference to the above machines is, that Turing machines may loop forever. If a Turing machine never loops it is called a decider.
    Surprisingly there are languages that are not Turing-recognizable, that is, there are computational problems that cannot be solved by any computer. There also are languages that are Turing-recognizable but not decidable, e.g., the halting problem.

At last we will look at the runtime of algorithms and discuss the P vs. NP problem which is one of the most prominent open problem in computer science.

 572
Lecture

This course will enable students to learn the theoretical underpinnings of User-Driven System Design. Students will be introduced to practical guidelines and principles for designing and evaluating systems with the user's needs as the primary focus. Topics covered include: Fundamental concepts and theories of Human-Computer Interaction, Methods for studying user interactions with systems, Techniques for evaluating usability of systems, and Approaches for implementing design ideas.The course will follow the principles of active learning. Students will be assigned reading material for analysis and presentation during class. Via various class activities, students will also experience the practical application of the concepts learned in the readings. Participation in class discussions and activities is an essential component of taking the course. At approximately the mid-point of the course, students will turn in a term paper report on an assigned, course-relevant topic. Additionally, students will work on an assigned course-relevant team project in groups of 2 or 3. At the end of the course, the teams will present their project to class and turn in a written report.

 496

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